Quotes

#AdventBotany 2018 Day 6: Christmas Bells — Culham Research Group

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Christmas bells is the name for a colourful South African geophyte (plant with an underground storage organ), Sandersonia aurantiaca, due to the appearance of its bell shaped flowers appearing in December-January. Of course, if you grow this in the UK or North America it will flower mid-summer, so very much a southern hemisphere Christmas plant.…

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#AdventBotany 2018, Day 5 – Winterberry — Culham Research Group

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Europeans are familiar with the evergreen holly, Ilex aquifolium, that is used as a midwinter decoration because it is evergreen and shows the promise of new life and growth in the spring. It’s also prized for its red berries. However, not all Ilex species are evergreen, one of the midwinter decorations in North America is…

via #AdventBotany 2018, Day 5 – Winterberry — Culham Research Group

#AdventBotany2018, Day 4: The Golden Bough — Culham Research Group

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By John David Not an obvious topic for Advent, but bear with me, the connection will become clear. The Golden Bough is most famously the title of a book written by Sir James Frazer and first published in two volumes in 1890 [complete text available – vol. 1, vol. 2], subtitled ‘A study in Magic…

via #AdventBotany2018, Day 4: The Golden Bough — Culham Research Group

#AdventBotany 2018, Day 3: The Pomander – a smorgasbord of Lamiaceae and Rutaceae with a pinch of Sperm Whale Poo — Culham Research Group

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by Fi Young As a child I remember my grandparents giving a pomander as a Christmas gift. Their pomander was made from an orange studded with cloves, and I don’t mean cloves of garlic unless you want to ward off vampires, but that’s another story! But is that all to the pomander? Well actually no!…

via #AdventBotany 2018, Day 3: The Pomander – a smorgasbord of Lamiaceae and Rutaceae with a pinch of Sperm Whale Poo — Culham Research Group

#AdventBotany 2018, Day 2: The homeless drupe – a look at the ‘precocious’ Prunus that US Marines won’t go near — Culham Research Group

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By Meg Cathcart-James What do Alexander the Great, Henry the VIII’s gardener and ancient China have in common? They all enjoyed apricots! Apricot fruit on the tree Although Alexander and the gardener are generally thought to have introduced the fruit to Greece and England respectively, their true home is still in dispute. Their Latin name,…

via #AdventBotany 2018, Day 2: The homeless drupe – a look at the ‘precocious’ Prunus that US Marines won’t go near — Culham Research Group

#AdventBotany 2018, Day 1: Put a Cherry on the Top! — Culham Research Group

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Red glace cherries on yellow marzipan For me, the glace cherry is a staple ingredient of Christmas cooking. I include them in both my Christmas cake and Christmas pudding recipes – both are based on ‘Delia Smith’s Christmas’ although her original version of the pudding recipe does not have cherries in. Cherry in English derives…

via #AdventBotany 2018, Day 1: Put a Cherry on the Top! — Culham Research Group

Mint! From the Ancient World to Modern Manchester — Stories from the Museum Floor

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Today’s Story From the Museum Floor, is by Fang from the Visitor Team where she takes a closer look at the medicinal uses of the mint plant, both in the ancient and modern worlds. For more about our Botany Collections have a look at the Curator’s blog. Mint – The Roman Empire, ancient Egypt and […]

via Mint! From the Ancient World to Modern Manchester — Stories from the Museum Floor