Identification

Good wildlife spotting everyone!

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With everyone staying close to home, this year the wildlife spotting for the City Nature Challenge has been really urban. If you have more images taken over the weekend, you can still upload them now into iNaturalist and your sighting will be added into the count. Otherwise, it’s time to try and identify all those finds! Let’s see how many we can push to be research grade records.

I suspect we’ve had far more pavement weeds this year than we did last year. Certainly, last year the top three organisms recorded where blackbirds, harlequin ladybirds and wood pigeons. So far this year, our top three are cuckooflowers, Herb Robert and dandelions. Of course, although the weekend of wildlife spotting is over, we’ve now got time to make sure as many records as possible are properly identified, so that list could change.

Happily, although everyone was limited to gardens and short walks, the weather was much kinder than last year allowing us to really enjoy our local wildlife. There have been plenty of bee and butterfly garden visitors and the occasional bird to watch as well as all the plants. If you have enjoyed a weekend of wildlife recording, check out Greater Manchester’s Local Record’s Centre so that you can continue putting nature on the map. There’s also advice from the Wildlife Trust for Lancashire, Manchester and North Merseyside on how to improve your garden for wildlife. Click here to apply for a free downloadable booklet from the My Wild City Manchetser project.

The City Nature Challenge weekend has been popular across the country with over 4,000 people taking part and just under 60,000 observations made. If know of a city or region that would want to take part next year, then get in touch with the organisers. The City Nature Challenge was invented and is managed by the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County and California Academy of Sciences: https://citynaturechallenge.org/

PANAMA WILDLIFE EVENING  – THURSDAY 18 APRIL, 2019

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The botany staff will be supporting the Panama wildlife evening showing a selection of plant species from Panama, as well as talk about the City Nature Challenge 2019 – coming to both Panama City and Greater Manchester soon!

 
A night of Panamanian festivities not to be missed!
 
Manchester Museum welcomes Critically Endangered Harlequin Frogs to its collection and is the only institution in the world to house these striking animals outside Panama. We would like to mark the launch of the Harlequin Frog Project with a celebration of Panamanian culture and wildlife. The project is a unique collaboration with the Panama Wildlife Conservation Charity (PWCC) and the Ministry of the Environment in Panama. Come and enjoy the taste of Panamanian drink with latin music, see the wealth of rare frogs from behind the scenes, and find out more about the impact our research, environmental education, and conservation work is making in Latin America.

Graphene’s high-rise meadow

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Green roof on the roof terrace of the Graphene Institute

Back in June, perhaps some of the Graphene Week 2015 attendees spotted this little patch of wildness on the roof of the National Graphene Institute at the University of Manchester. This green roof was installed as the building was nearing completion in 2014 and is part of the commitment to improving the University’s campus as a habitat for wildlife. The University’s green roof policy can be found here, along with the other University policies about environmental sustainability.

Bee on Birdsfoot trefoil

Ahead of Graphene Week, the Biodiversity Working Group put together some information about pollinators, their requirements and the urban environment in order to have a sign in place for the delegates to read. This roof is particularly designed to attract bees, both wild bees and the honey bees from hives on roofs of the Manchester Museum and Whitworth Art Gallery.

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The roof was created with a ‘sedum and wildflower’ mat made up with 21 different species. The low-growing sedums are now most visible around the sloping edges of the meadow, and taller species seem to dominate towards the middle. However, perhaps that’s not true; the sedums may be just hidden by the taller growing plants.

Maiden pink flower

This summer, the Faculty of Life Sciences has arranged for a student to survey the roof to see how the plants are distributed.  The Biodiversity Working Group will be continuing to monitor the roof’s progress to see how the composition of plants changes from this baseline. Some plants are likely to thrive, some will struggle and other’s will arrive as seeds blow over the roof or fall off people’s clothing.

Ladybird pupa on Sedum reflexum

Coralroot orchid and Walney Island geranium

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Geranium sanguineum var. striatum (Walney Island geranium) found only on Walney island, to the west of Barrow-in-Furness, was spotted flowering this week on sand dunes by one of our botany volunteers.  Image

 

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The coral root orchid (Corallorhiza trifida) is a parasite growing in association with a fungus.  It grows on the creeping willow at Sandscale Haws. It was found after arranging a visit with the warden, as it is endangered.  Last year no plants were seen at this location but this year over 70 plants were counted.

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Manchester Herbarium

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looking down the corridor

A lovely review of a visit to our herbarium from the blog of Tim Body: Manchester Herbarium. Tim is an MMU ecology student and his blog From here to ecology is well worth a read.

Buttercups at Cambridge

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The course I attended (Flowering Plant Families) is run by Cambridge University staff.  This is Dr Tim Upson introducing the course at the Botanic Garden, by the lake. We had just seen a grass snake and joked about how plants often get upstaged by animals!

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Ranunculaceae is the Buttercup family, which contains many ornamentals.  Well known members are the buttercup (obvs), Delphinium, Aquilegia and Thalictrum.  The plants are mainly herbs, with a few climbers (Clematis).  It has a world wide distribution and plants in this family contain alkaloids – some are poisonous, like Aconitum.

The family name Ranunculaceae is pronounced ran-un-queue –lacey.

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A buttercup pulled apart: this family is not characterised by the number of petals and sepals as they are variable.  Linking characters for Ranunculaceae: flower parts are free and not fused, and spirally arranged along the elongated receptacle. There are numerous stamens and carpels.

Buttercups are actinomorphic which means they are radially symmetrical, as opposed to zygomorphic (bilaterally symmetrical).  Think of a cup and saucer – the saucer is actinomorphic (symmetrical along 3 planes) but the cup is zygomorphic (symmetrical along 2 planes).

The following three illustrations of Hellebore varieties are taken from our cultivated collection. Despite names such as ‘Christmas Rose’, this plant is not in the rose family but the buttercup family.  The first is from ‘The Garden’ the monthly magazine of the Royal Horticultural Society, 1879. The second was from another horticultural magazine: Edwards’s Botanical Register by S.T. Edwards & J. Lindley, 1838, and the third illustration was taken from Paxton’s Flower Garden, 1850-53 by J. Paxton.

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A herbarium sheet of Anemone nemorosa (wood anemone), from the buttercup family, collected by Lydia Becker in Whalley Wood, April 1864 for the British Botanical Competition. Lydia Becker was a suffragette and was born in Chadderton, Manchester.Image

Brassicaceae at Cambridge

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Last summer I spent a wonderful week in Cambridge, on the Flowering Plant Families course at the Cambridge University Botanic Garden.  It was a warm sunny week, and around 20 of us sat at microscopes in a classroom, the windows open to let in a summer breeze.  We had tea, biscuits and fresh plant material in jam jars around us.

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jars of fresh material and suggested reading

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This is the first in a series of plant identification blog posts, based on what I learnt at Cambridge.

One of the simplest plant families to start with is the cabbage family – Brassicaceae (pronounced brass ick ay see).

This is one of the simplest families to recognise as it has distinctive characteristics which are repeated.  The characters are

Sepals (calyx): 4

Petals (corolla): 4

Androecium (stamens): 6 (2 short, 4 long)

Gynoecium (carpels): 2 fused

The fruit is a siliqua – a pod like capsule with 2 united carpels.

I pulled the flower apart and laid it out so the parts are easy to see:

Rocket - Eruca sativa, Brassicaceae

This plant family is also called Cruciferae. This name comes from the cross (or crucifix) shape made by the four petals. It is easier to see in some species than others.

It is a family of annuals or perennial herbs, which contain mustard oils (glucosinolates) which give cabbage and Brussels sprouts their strong flavour.  Leaves are alternate and can be simple or toothed/lobed.

There are many economic uses – food like cabbage, rocket, broccoli and cauliflower, plus mustard and cress.  Oil is obtained from oil seed rape.  Other family members are grown as ornamental garden plants, such as honesty, stocks and wallflower.

eruca sativa

This is a herbarium sheet in the Manchester Museum of Eruca sativa (rocket). It was collected in St-Anne’s-on-the-Sea, Lancashire by Charles Bailey, one of our big collectors, in 1907. The handwritten number starting with EM, just above the printed label, is the database number we give each of our specimens.

This is a good, simple guide to the parts of a flower http://www.amnh.org/learn/biodiversity_counts/ident_help/Parts_Plants/parts_of_flower.htm